Rightly Using “Be Ready Always” — Summary

This is a summary of five posts on one of the most commonly misunderstood / misused verses in Scripture, I Peter 3:15, which tells us to “be ready always to give an answer….”

Misusing I Peter 3:15 — “Be Ready Always” — Part One — This verse is NOT about 1) being skilled in presenting the Gospel 2) modern apologetics ministries defending the truth and reasonableness of the Gospel 3) defending / teaching Biblical Christianity.  This verse is about how believers respond to persecution.

Misusing I Peter 3:15 — “Be Ready Always” — Part Two — “As Peter’s readers face a fiery trial, the Holy Spirit guides him to give a message that says, ‘Courage, dear hearts! The Lord is on our side! Fear Him, and Him alone.’”

Misusing I Peter 3:15 — “Be Ready Always” — Part Three — The use of the Greek word apologia in this verse is most certainly not referring to the modern apologetics ministry of preparing a logical defense of our faith.  “Be ready always” does not mean to prepare a defense — that is directly contrary to both the teachings of Jesus and the pattern that we see in Scripture.  It refers rather to spiritual preparation.

Rightly Using I Peter 3:15 — “Be Ready Always” — Part Four — Discussing the meaning of “sanctify the Lord God in your hearts,” which is actually the main focus of the verse — “be ready always” is a supplementary thought, one of the ways we sanctify the Lord God in our hearts.

Rightly Using I Peter 3:15 — “Be Ready Always” — Part Five — The importance of a holy, hope-filled life in times of severe persecution.  “Those with no hope will want to know the reason for yours.”  But if you don’t “sanctify the Lord God in your hearts,” that will never happen….

 

About Jon Gleason

Pastor of Free Baptist Church of Glenrothes
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2 Responses to Rightly Using “Be Ready Always” — Summary

  1. Matt Parker says:

    GREAT posts, all. Really enjoyed them. Glad to see someone else beating this drum! Thank, Jon.

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