Tag Archives: NTTC

Unprovable Historical Textual Assumptions

Assumptions must match reality. The greatest reality in dealing with Scripture is what God Himself said in His Word. Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

So Everyone Could Use It

I would give up every book I own, including my first edition of the OED, my Civil War edition of the Merriam Webster’s Unabridged, etc., etc., etc., so everyone could use it any time they wanted rather than that only … Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

I Guess Oldest is Only Best When We Want it to Be

When you don’t rely on God’s revealed truth, but instead make yourself the only authority for your own evidence-immune theory, you epitomise Self-Reliance. Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

The “Best Manuscripts” are Sloppy Copies (???)

Welcome to the manuscript version of the sinner’s excuse! “Sure, I’m bad, but no worse than the guy next door.” Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Textual Criticism’s Worst Assumption

I do care about textual critics, either intentionally or accidentally, using naturalistic evolutionary philosophies in their evaluations when they try to tell us which words are the ones God gave us. Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments

The “Oldest and Best” Wording

It would be better to drop the “oldest and best” terminology. At best, it is confusing. “Old” only matters if it is one of the “best,” so it would be better to just say “best” and leave it at that. Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Is the Oldest Manuscript Really Best?

Our “oldest manuscripts” survived because they weren’t accurate, so believers didn’t want to use them. They were sloppy work by careless scribes, and no one wanted to copy from them. Continue reading

Posted in Bibliology, NT Textual Criticism | Tagged , , , , , , | 36 Comments